Month: August 2015

In the Market for a Two-Stage Air Compressor?

 Here’s What You Need to Know

If you’ve been in an auto body shop recently (which is unfortunate because it probably means you’ve had fender bender) or a small manufacturing operation, you may have heard the not-so-inconspicuous hum and rattle of an air compressor. More than likely it was a two-stage compressor. Why not a single-stage? ML10_DuplexGenerally, single-stage units are for less demanding operations like home garages or construction job sites where the distinctive pop, pop, pop sound of nail guns pierce the air like firecrackers on the 4th of July. Nail guns or the occasional use of a rachet gun only require single-stage compressors.

So, why would you need a two-stage air compressor? There are three main reasons:

  • Redundancy – If one pump/motor fails or needs service or repair, the other pump/motor can continue to operate, avoiding downtime. Important for any business. Your air flow may be cut in half, but it's better than shutting down your business while the compressor is service.
  • Electrical Limitations – What if you absolutely need a 10-15HP compressor but three-phase electrical service is either not available or too expensive run? A duplex compressor with single-phase pump/motors would be your solution.
  • Varying Air Usage – If you’re air needs, CFM, fluctuates throughout the work day, where one minute you’re using a small hand tool and the next a sand blaster, a two-stage compressor is perfect to help regulate air flow. When air consumption needs are low, only one pump/motor will operate on your two-stage compressor, but both pumps kick in when demand increases. Smart little boogers, aren't they.

If you’re in the market for a new two-stage compressor, here’s what to look for before you commit.

HP (Horsepower)

Definition: One HP is the force needed to lift 550 lbs. one foot in one second.

With all the hubbub made over HP, the CFM (cubic feet per minute) your compressor can generate is actually a more critical factor. But, it’s true that generally speaking, the more HP you have, the more CFM it can produce, so there is a direct correlation that can’t be overlooked. That said, it’s more prudent to shop by CFM, not HP.

CFM (cubic feet per minute)

Every air tool in your shop has a specific CFM requirement—the higher the CFM, the more air volume the tool uses. Keep in mind that if you’re a furniture shop then your sanders will require more air than nail guns.

Take an inventory of CFM requirements for each tool, and the number of everyday tools, and then calculate your necessary CFM, regardless of whether they will all be operating at the same time or not.

Voltage

Single-phase? Three-phase? What’s the diff?

Generally speaking, single-phase electrical is found in residential settings. Three-phase in commercial buildings, manufacturing operations, etc. So, obviously your first consideration whether to choose a single-phase or three-phase compressor is based on where you will be using it.

Sidenote: Three-phase electricity is considered to be more efficient and therefore could result in less wear and tear on your compressor’s motor.

Keep in mind that electrical codes, voltage and phase vary widely geographically so be sure to check your local building codes and with an electrician before laying out that credit card.

Gallons

So, now how big of a tank do you need for your compressor? How many gallons?

With two-stage compressors tank sizes range from 60 – 200 gallons. The size of your tank should be basedon how often the compressor will be in use.

This should give you enough to go when choosing your next, or first, two-stage compressor and enough ammunition to ask intelligent questions.

If you should have questions regarding purchasing a two-stage compressor, call our customer service department and we will be happy to assist you: 800-925-5431. Or, visit us online at: us.fscurtis.com

Click on the icons below to download product information about FS-Curtis reciprocating compressors.

Food Processing Plants Losing Profits Due to Inefficient Compressed Air Systems

How One Food Processing Plant Saved $150.000 Annually

The majority of processing food plants use air compressors for various operations, including cylinder activation, cleanup operations, hoists, agitator drives, pump drives, enclosure cooling, dewatering and de-ionizing. But too often these daily operations are typically ignored as a source of waste.

According to the Advanced Manufacturing Office in the U.S. Department of Energy's Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE), American industries spend $5 billion annually on compressed air. In the case of food plants, costs are not documented, leaving compressed air systems principal candidates for waste and abuse.food_plant

Follow these 5 steps to save your food processing plant enough money by the end of the year that you'll be glad you took five minutes to read this article.

  1. Examine and analyze your compressed air system
    Note all the uses of compressed air in the plant and all the air compressors available by enlisting the help of engineers and technicians, and then:
- Record all useage points, volumes and     pressures, applying known values or best estimates. Make sure you are using the correct air compressor for your operation.
- Understand and master your air compressor system and controllers. Find out how much it costs to operate and maintain your system per year based on current expenses or estimations.
- Diagram your compressed air system, including piping, so everyone will be able to see it and help to identify and correct the deficiencies.
  1. Conduct a self-audit of your compressed air system

    There are 10 most important targets to evaluate in a compressed air system audit:

- Leak problems
- Over-pressurization
- Matched supply and demand
- Inappropriate use of piping tees
- Improperly sized piping
- Flow restrictions
- Inadequate air storage
- Inappropriate use of compressed air
- The use of electrical drives instead of air
- Maintenance of filters and separators.
  1. Estimate actions to repair deficienciesCorrect the problems that are the least expensive to repair. Using a Pareto diagram can be useful to help separate the “critical few” deficiencies from the “trivial many” possibilities that are available. For example, the Pareto diagram is shown in figure 1, where the solution for the problem is listed on the X-axis (Improvement). The Y-axis (Savings) shows the estimated savings (less costs) that would result from repairing the problem. Projects shown in the tallest bars should be choosen for implementation.
    graphic_2
    Figure 1: Pareto diagram helps to select the most effective actions.
  2. Implement the best solutionsAfter identifying the best alternatives in step three, it is time to execute. Beware that some processors postpone taking action because of time constrains, but it may be worthy to hire extra help to carry out recommended solutions right away. Every action should be measurable in terms of cost and savings.
  1. Track resultsAll solutions that were implemented should be reviewed regularly to ensure that the results are as expected, or to find out if something has changed or requires additional attention. Once recommnded changes are made, then the five-step process can be repeated to double check yourself.

If you think your company could benefit from having a compressed air system audit performed, viist this link to find a distributor in your area to inquire about scheduling an audit. You can also call our toll free number to talk with a customer service rep about locating an FS-Curtis distributor in your area: 800-925-5431.

 

Click Here To Download             Click Here To Download 

Click icons to download product literature for compressors used in the food processing industry.

Check out this article: Food industry factory saves $154.000 in annual energy costs, to see how one plant was able to save over $150.000 annually in energy costs.

Source: Oklahoma State University. Food technology fact sheet.